Depression Vulnerability Factors and How to Avoid Them


Reasons Why Some of Us Are So Vulnerable to Depression

Depression is a mental illness that refuses to discriminate. There isn’t a man, woman or child on this planet that isn’t susceptible to depression and whether we like to admit it or not, depression is a serious issue that could hit anyone at any given time for any given reason.

Depression is as dangerous as it is common: if left untreated or undiagnosed, it can lead to suicidal ideation in those who are affected by its devastating symptoms. Depression is so dangerous, in fact, that it kills more teenagers and young adults than traffic accidents and drug overdoses, combined.

As severe and dangerous as depression is, it is highly treatable. Even more importantly, however, is that it is comprehensively understood, a depressive disorder is also highly avoidable. The more we understand about our inherent vulnerability to depression, the more successful we can be in treating, and even avoiding, this mental illness, altogether.

Understanding Our Depression “Vulnerabilities” and How to Avoid Clinical Sadness

So, what makes some people more inclined to become depressed than others? Experts say that in many instances, it is a person’s attitudes and erroneous beliefs that are to blame. These faulty behavioral and mental mindsets are known as, ‘vulnerability’ factors. The more vulnerability factors a person has, the more likely they are to develop depression.

The following article provides a list of 10 vulnerability factors that put a person at risk of developing mild to severe depression. If you are among the millions of chronically depressed, avoiding these vulnerability factors are one key to helping you overcome your unwelcomed depression.

To continue reading, please click the link below:

People’s thoughts and attitudes explain why some develop depression following stressful life events. The following list provides an overview of various vulnerability factors that put a person at risk for developing depression. There are indications that these distorted beliefs precede the initial onset of depression. Thus, improving faulty thinking may help to prevent depressive mood.